Uki-otoshi (Floating drop) 浮落

»»»»Uki-otoshi (Floating drop) 浮落

Dieser Beitrag ist auch verfügbar auf: deDeutsch

Uki-otoshi (Floating drop) 浮落

Group: Nage-waza » Tachi-waza » Te-waza
Gokyo: 32th Technique (Yonkyo 4th Group 8th Technique)

Tori lifts Uke to his right (left) front corner, breaks his balance, and firmly pulls him forward and down with both hands to throw him.

Hints

  • Do not pull Uke forward violently. Quietly bring him out with you. More than the way he comes forward, the timing and body movements in your backward retreat will be the key to success or failure in this technique.

Short description

Uki-otoshi (Floating drop) 浮落

In the uki-otoshi you raise your opponent and draw him forward so that he seems to float;then, making use of his forward inertia, you force him off balance and throw him wide to the floor by stepping to the rear.
As Uke starts to get into the right natural position by putting his right foot forward, draw your own right foot slightly to the rear. Using tsugi-ashi steps, move to the rear, and pull Uke to his right front. To keep from losing his balance he will take some tsugi-ashi steps toward you. Retreat still further, beginning on your left foot, and trying all the harder to force your opponent off balance. He will come forward in an attempt to remain stable.
Wen you see your chance, begin taking mucher larger steps – larger ones than those your opponent is taking – to the rear. Stand on the toes of your left foot, and kneel on your left knee. At the same time, pull hard with both hands. As your opponent comes leaning forward to his right, swing him from your left to the rear in a large arc, and throw him.

Execution

Uki-otoshi (Floating drop) 浮落

Description

Uki-otoshi (Floating drop) 浮落

Tori and Uke face each other in basic natural posture. Uke steps forward with the right foot to begin grappling with Tori in right natural posture.
Tori uses this opportunity, and takes a step backward with the left foot in the tsugi-ashi (moving with one foot leading, the other following) form while drawing Uke, in a right natural posture, and begins to break his balance forward. Uke responds by trying to maintain his balance and takes a step forward with the right foot in the tsugi-ashi form.
Again, tori takes a step backward with the left foot in the tsugi-ashi form while drawing Uke and begins to break his balance forward.
Uke responds again by trying to maintain his balance and takes a step forward with the right foot in the tsugi-ashi form.
Tori pulls Uke forward again, and at the moment Uke, in response to being pulled, takes a step forward with the right foot, Tori breaks his balance forward, quickly takes a large step backward with the left foot, while dropping the left knee roughly to the left of and just behind the right foot (the angle of the left lower leg from the line running from the rear of the right foot should be from 30 to 45 degrees). In one stroke, Tori throws Uke by firmly pulling him forward with both hands. Uke is thrown in a large circle around the fulcrum of the tip of the right foot.

At the moment Ukes balance is broken, Tori must pull down with both hands synchronizing this action with the force generated from dropping to the left knee and lowering the body. He must pull down sharply with both hands by projecting energy from the left hip, not by twisting round.

Combination

Uki-otoshi (Floating drop) 浮落

Counter

Uki-otoshi (Floating drop) 浮落

  • Tai-otoshi
  • O-soto-otoshi

More information

Uki-otoshi (Floating drop) 浮落

Dieser Beitrag ist auch verfügbar auf: deDeutsch

2018-05-16T17:25:22+00:00